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What's happening with New Manchester Walks

These Are The Official Manchester Tours

New Manchester Walks is the only official, trained, expert group of guides operating commercially in the Manchester area.

Entertaining, exciting guiding: why be bored on a tour?

Our mission is to open up Manchester history to as many people as possible though our tours, walks, talks, articles and books. It’s a bit of a battle, given that Manchester’s history has been severely mistreated for decades…
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Your safety is important to us!

Your safety is important to us. We are abiding tourist board safety recommendations regarding social distancing, so numbers are limited.
Therefore we would like you to book on eventbrite.

So, take to the great outdoors, safely and soundly, with New Manchester Walks

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School’s Out? Discover Manchester’s History

Manchester became the world’s first industrial centre at the end of the 18th century, and within a hundred years was the second city of the empire, a vast commercial and cultural hub, setting for the greatest Town Hall in the country, home of the brilliant newspaper the Manchester Guardian, and an exciting reputation as the home of protest, progression and culture. Hear the full story with Manchester’s expert historian, Ed Glinert.

Next tour: Thu 20 August 2020.
Meet: TfGM travelshop, Piccadilly Gardens, 11.30am.
Booking: Please book with eventbrite.
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Confused about the new rules and regulations in Greater Manchester? Come on a tour: safe, sound and stylish. £11 for one, £16.50 for two

Spain’s out, America’s out and Okunoshima Island off the coast of Japan is overrun with rabbits but has no inhabitants. So forget going abroad and holiday in Manchester. The city is overrun with history and you can take part in it at cheap and nourishing prices:

£11 for one person
£16.50 for two.
Please book with eventbrite. If you can’t, let us know.
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What Shall We Do With the Manchester Statues?

It’s not just Bristol (and London as Sadiq Khan has just discovered) that have the wrong statues. Manchester is full of them. First of all, the most glaring anomaly, is that in a city that prides itself as one of the most left-wing in the country there are more statues of Tories than socialists: 3-2 at the last count.

Funnily enough the people, yes, we the people, are to blame for this in one respect. When the public was asked a few years ago to choose a new statue that had to be of a woman, under-represented in the city’s statuary, there was huge support for Emmeline Pankhurst at the expense of her more deserving daughter, Sylvia. It was hardly surprising…
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WHY CENTRAL LIBRARY LOOKS LIKE THE PANTHEON

* The following article is now featured on the ILoveMcr website.
* New Manchester Walks’s architecture tours are the only expert architecture tours taking place in the city. They have been devised by RIBA judge Ed Glinert, aided as always by John Alker. A new date for the next tour will be announced soon as it is possible to do so. In the meantime, here is a wonderful story explaining why Manchester Central Library is modelled on Rome’s Pantheon.

***

You may have noticed that Manchester’s Central Library looks like The Pantheon of Rome. It is so strikingly obvious. But it begs the question why?
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THE FIRST EVER VIRTUAL TOUR OF MANCHESTER

This is New Manchester Walks’ first virtual tour. It’s all we can do at this time, sadly, but we love to give good value.

So sit back, bring to your mind the geography of the area around Manchester Town Hall, and soak in the history on this section of our ingenious “Undiscovered Manchester” walk that we plan to run when things return to normal, using the real-life route and a history highlight at each stop. 
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HONOURING MANCHESTER’S GREATEST WRITER, THOMAS DE QUINCEY

Next year, 2021, will see the bicentenary of one of the most spellbinding and hypnotic books in English literature, Thomas de Quincey’s Confessions of An English Opium-Eater, a work with such a strong Manchester connection. Thomas de Quincey (1785-1859) is still woefully overlooked and obscure.
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