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What's happening with New Manchester Walks

THE FIRST EVER VIRTUAL TOUR OF MANCHESTER!

This is New Manchester Walks’ first virtual tour. It’s all we can do at this time, sadly, but we love to give good value.

So sit back, bring to your mind the geography of the area around Manchester Town Hall, and soak in the history on this section of our ingenious “Undiscovered Manchester” walk that we plan to run when things return to normal, using the real-life route and a history highlight at each stop. 
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REGULAR UPDATES (EARLY APRIL 2020): SADLY ALL TOURS TEMPORARILY POSTPONED UNTIL FUTURE DATES CAN BE PLANNED. STAY WELL!

Hello. Ed Glinert of New Manchester Walks here. Thinking of you all and praying we all keep well. I can’t do much other than sincerely wish all customers, past, present and future, and all tour guides the best of health. Like you, we’re itching to get back to normality. In the meantime I will post up articles on Manchester history and art to keep you entertained…
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HONOURING MANCHESTER’S GREATEST WRITER, THOMAS DE QUINCEY

Next year, 2021, will see the bicentenary of one of the most spellbinding and hypnotic books in English literature, Thomas de Quincey’s Confessions of An English Opium-Eater, a work with such a strong Manchester connection. Thomas de Quincey (1785-1859) is still woefully overlooked and obscure.
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A GREAT MANCHESTER PAINTING TO CHEER YOU UP: WORK by FORD MADOX BROWN

Today’s Manchester painting dissected, discussed and dismembered is “Work” by Ford Madox Brown (1852-65). Ed Glinert reveals all behind Manchester Art Gallery’s most complex and epic painting.
No painting in Manchester Art Gallery attracts more viewers than “Work”. Hordes of people make for it as if by magic, and when they get there they are astonished at the breathtaking panoply of figures, ideas and stories.
On first inspection
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PAINTING OF THE PREVIOUS WEEK: THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD. OUR VIRTUAL TOUR WHILE NO WALKS CAN TAKE PLACE

Today’s Manchester picture to enjoy while the Gallery is closed and we can’t take you on art tours: “The Light of the World” by William Holman Hunt (1851-53).

Manchester Art Gallery owns one of three versions of William Holman Hunt’s 1856 Pre-Raphaelite work “The Light of the World”. The others are in Keble College, Oxford, and the crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral. Yes, it may be unusual to have more than one version of a painting, but what is even more unusual about the Manchester one is that it may well not be by Hunt, but by his pupil Fred Stephens.
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WHY CENTRAL LIBRARY LOOKS LIKE THE PANTHEON

* The following article is now featured on the ILoveMcr website.
* New Manchester Walks’s architecture tours are the only expert architecture tours taking place in the city. They have been devised by RIBA judge Ed Glinert, aided as always by John Alker. A new date for the next tour will be announced soon as it is possible to do so. In the meantime, here is a wonderful story explaining why Manchester Central Library is modelled on Rome’s Pantheon.

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You may have noticed that Manchester’s Central Library looks like The Pantheon of Rome. It is so strikingly obvious. But it begs the question why?
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CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF WOMEN IN PARLIAMENT

Just over a hundred years ago, on 1 December 1919, something unprecedented happened in British politics: a woman entered Parliament for the first time. American socialite Nancy Astor had just won a by-election in Plymouth Sutton for the Tories, replacing her husband, Waldorf Astor, who had just been ennobled ironically.
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GREAT REVIEWS KEEP COMING IN!

This from St Paul’s School of London after a Literary Manchester tour

Dear Ed,

I wanted to say a very warm thank you for the tour you gave our students on Thursday 17 October. It was a brilliant introduction to the city and to Manchester’s literary and cultural history. Great for the kids to hear about some of the less heralded figures like Ainsworth and Spring as well as the bigger names. The kids were really buzzing afterwards and you gave them some great hints for further reading.
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