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The Pre-Raphaelites

Next tour: Sat 16 November 2019.
Meet: Art Gallery Entrance, Mosley Street.
Booking: Please press here to book with eventbrite.

This is a tour in honour of women. Women who dazed and dazzled. Who starred and shone. Who glowed and gleamed through the canvas and the frames.

They were amongst the most feted women of the 19th century, captured for all time in intensely saturated luminous colour by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and their circle, but their names are still barely known to the public: Jane Burden, Elizabeth Siddal, Emma Watkins, Alexa Wilding…

They were the Pre-Raphaelite women featured in some of the most important British paintings ever created including Autumn Leaves, Astarte Syriaca, Work, The Light of the World and The Hireling Shepherd which live in Manchester Art Gallery.

Ed Glinert, official Manchester tour guide and author of Penguin’s Manchester Compendium, leads this fascinating fact-filled tour around the gallery’s best loved Victorian models and their contemporaries.

* And before you scream “it’s a man!”, like Sarah Harris, yes, it’s Jesus, but it’s Jesus modelled by Christina Rossetti…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pre-Raphaelites were Britain’s most important art school. They were aesthetes and zealots determined to bring honesty, drama and colourful vitality to staid Victorian painting.

They were formed in 1848, the year of revolution across Europe. But this was no political coup. This was art terrorism, powered by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais.

Reacting against the reactionary nature of Joshua Reynolds and the Royal Academy, they wished to create a body of work similar in brightness of colour, attention to detail, and honest simplicity to the period of Italian painting prior to Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520).

Rossetti wanted the group’s name to include the then fashionable term “Early Christian”, but when Hunt objected he proposed “Pre-Raphaelite”. Rossetti then added the word “Brotherhood”, as he wanted the society to be secret, in line with the Italian political group the Carbonaris in that year of revolution across Europe. When the artists staged their first exhibition Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s The Girlhood of Mary Virgin was signed “PRB” to maintain the society’s air of mystery.

Manchester has an unrivalled collection of the PRB’s works, dominated by William Holman Hunt’s spiritual Light of the World, his daring Shadow of Death and the eerie Scapegoat. This is art which benefits from intense scrutiny; from unravelling and demystifying the religious connotations and human dramas involved.