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Event List Calendar

16/02/2019

Knutsford in the Spring

Next (mega) tour: Saturday 16 February 2019.
Meet: Above Knutsford Station on Toft Road, 11.30am.
Booking: Please book here with eventbrite.

This is a sumptuous tour laced with character and charisma, for this is the classiest village in the vicinity, smouldering with salubriousness and serenity.

We will stroll around town to hear about Mrs Gaskell and Cranford, Alan Turing, the highwayman Edward Higgins, Tatton Park and wartime saboteurs, and then have a break in an attractive establishment.

After a break we will finish with the highlight: a saunter along the most remarkable street in England; maddening, mad, marvellous architecture.
At the end we will collapse into the Legh Arms for a much-needed pint.

High Morland on Legh Road, the most remarkable residential street in England
High Morland on Legh Road, the most remarkable residential street in England

 

* For more information see elsewhere on this site: http://www.newmanchesterwalks.com/walks-tours/places-ancoats-to-worsley/knutsford-classy-cranford-in-chi-chi-cheshire/

 

High Morland on Legh Road, the most remarkable residential street in England

High Morland on Legh Road, the most remarkable residential street in England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information see elsewhere on this site: http://www.newmanchesterwalks.com/walks-tours/places-ancoats-to-worsley/knutsford-classy-cranford-in-chi-chi-cheshire/

Start: 16/02/2019 11:30 am
End: 16/02/2019 2:30 pm
Venue: Outside Knutsford Station on Toft Road
Address:
Google Map
Toft Road, Knutsford, United Kingdom
Cost: £12

25/02/2019

Anthony Burgess’s Manchester (birthday celebration)

Next tour: Anthony Burgess’s birthday.
Date: Mon 25 February 2019.
Meet: St Ann’s Church, 11.30am.
Booking: Please book here with eventbrite.

Image result for anthony burgess manchester

He was a polymath and polyglot who chain smoked for England and wrote more words than Dickens, Wells and Trollope combined.

Manchester was his city, even though once he had enough money to move out of Moss Side he migrated to Monaco. As the great man may himself have said: “the future’s clockwork; the future’s orange.”

Ed Glinert, Penguin author and editor of Penguin Classics’ Sherlock Holmes stories, leads this walking tour around the great man’s Manchester haunts, finishing at the Anthony Burgess Centre.

anthony-burgess 1

Start: 25/02/2019 11:30 am
End: 25/02/2019 1:00 pm
Venue: St Ann's Church
Address:
Google Map
St Ann Street, Manchester, United Kingdom, M2 7LF
Cost: around £10

01/03/2019

The Secret History of Manchester !!SOLD OUT!!

• Fri 1 March 2019, 5.30pm.
!!SOLD OUT!!

You think you know Manchester? Well, no one knows it like Ed Glinert who has spent 40 years unturning every last (Gothic) stone in the city, uncovering layer upon layer of other histories, lesser-known stories, the secret side of the city to create the ultimate “believe it or not”.

On this we hear about:
* The atomic bunker under Piccadilly Gardens.
* Racist GIs during the Second World War and the drama they caused.
* The planned demolition of the Town Hall.
* L. S. Lowry, the secret sadist.
* The attack on the paintings at the Art Gallery.
* The pillar box that didn’t survive the 1996 IRA bomb events.

It’s the Manchester that nobody knows…apart from Glinert and you after you’ve been on this tour!

 

Girl with Bow c1973

IRA Bomb 1

Start: 01/03/2019 5:30 pm
End: 01/03/2019 7:10 pm
Venue: 2018 Visitor Centre
Address:
Google Map
Junction Piccadilly Gardens & Portland Street, Manchester, United Kingdom, M1 1RG
Cost: around £10

03/03/2019

Exploring Ancoats (Part 1, Little Italy)

Ancoats Day, Sunday 3 March 2019

Part 1, Little Italy, 11.30am.
Meet:
Band on the Wall, Swan Street.
Booking: Please book here with eventbrite.

Part 2, New Islington, 2pm. 
Meet:
New Islington tram stop.
Booking:
Please book here with eventbrite.

We explore the backstreets and forgotten corners of Ancoats, the world’s first industrial suburb. This inner-city area, just east of Manchester city centre, was converted from market gardens and fields into a land of mills blackened with soot with frightening ferocity at the end of the 18th century.

Many of the downtrodden workforce were Irish, imported because they could be paid less than the locals, and they were joined by Italians fleeing il risorgimento to bring ice cream to the begrimed city in the 19th century. Ancoats was abandoned by the council with forcible depopulating in the mid-20th century but it is now being imaginatively revived as essential 21st century Manchester with new flats, businesses and a bustling marina.

Ancoats mills

Here’s a further taster?
Industry began in Ancoats, a factory hoot from Manchester city centre. In 1700 it was a semi-rural enclave by the river Medlock, with Ancoats Hall home to the lords of the Manchester manor. By 1800 this was a teeming, squalid suburb, blackened with soot, the smell of belching smoke hanging in the air.

The conditions were shocking: the noise of thundering machinery, suffocating air, high accident rates and notorious employment practices at the expense of an emaciated, underpaid workforce slave-driven for unsustainably long hours amidst disease, darkness, damp and desperate heat, living in dingy streets of tiny workers’ houses, jerry-built two-up two down brick boxes standing back-to-back so that as many properties as possible could be squeezed into the smallest of spaces.

Child labour was rife.

As one Ancoats mill owner explained to the early 19th century poet laureate Robert Southey, when he visited Manchester in 1808, “You see these children, sir. By the time they are seven or eight years old they are bringing in the money. They come at five in the morning, they leave at six and another set relieves them for the night; the wheels never stand still.”

This was never a pleasant area, yet some of the mid 19th century buildings, such as the Ice Palace, which we will visit on the walk, were exquisitely detailed with Italianate effects, perfect for the large influx of Italian immigrants, while the earlier mill buildings by the Rochdale Canal, though functional and formal, were palaces of Mammon, monuments to mercantilism, magnificent in their might and mass.

Later experiments in social planning saw some wonderful additions to the locale: the vast Victoria Square, Manchester’s oldest surviving municipal estate, is still an astonishing site. Even more striking is the jazzy Daily Express building on Great Ancoats Street, its gorgeous curves of glass and vitrolite the perfect coating for what was then a quality mass market newspaper owned by the formidable Lord Beaverbrook.

The late 20th century saw Ancoats die. The mills shut, the workshops wound down, the canal almost dried up. Now it’s all cleaned up. The mills are modern workshops; the factories smart apartments, while new developments such as the much lauded New Islington project with its funkily named Chips Building and Dutch-styled houses are attracting investment…slowly.

Image result for new houses in ancoats

Facebook: Ancoats Forever

 

Start: 03/03/2019 11:30 am
End: 03/03/2019 1:00 pm
Venue: Band on the Wall
Address:
Google Map
Swan Street, Manchester, United Kingdom, M4 5JZ
Cost: £10

03/03/2019

Exploring Ancoats (Part 2, New Islington)

Ancoats - Roundhouse (Lowry)

 

 

 

 

Ancoats Day, Sunday 3 March 2019

Part 1, Little Italy, 11.30am.
Meet:
Band on the Wall, Swan Street.
Booking: Please book here with eventbrite.

Part 2, New Islington, 2pm. 
Meet:
New Islington tram stop.
Booking:
Please book here with eventbrite.

This is the forgotten end of Ancoats, with its strange Londonesque name, once home to the Royal Ruby Cycle Company, which made bikes for the Russian Tsar; filthily industrially Holt Town; and infamous Every Street, the thoroughfare that launched a thousand bad music hall jokes. That’s where the socialist graveyard with a safety tomb could be found, next to the Roundhouse Settlement, painted by Lowry, with its Henry Hunt of Peterloo Memorial, and grand Ancoats Hall where Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed.

Start: 03/03/2019 2:00 pm
End: 03/03/2019 3:40 pm
Venue: New Islington Metrolink stop
Address:
Google Map
Manchester, United Kingdom
Cost: £10

08/03/2019

International Women’s Day

No description has been entered for this event.

Start: 08/03/2019
End: 08/03/2019
Address:
Google Map
United Kingdom

08/03/2019

Emmeline Pankhurst’s Manchester

* Fri 8 March 2019, Emmeline Pankhurst statue, St Peter’s Square, 2.30pm.
International Women’s Day
Please book here with eventbrite.

Time magazine named the Moss Side-born Suffragette leader as one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th century. We will be walking in her Manchester footsteps. Here’s why.

In August 1819 at least a dozen people were killed demonstrating for the right to vote at St Peter’s Fields, Manchester. Nearly a hundred years later, in 1903, the Pankhurst family, disgusted with the Independent Labour Party’s refusal to allow women to use the newly-opened Pankhurst Hall in north Manchester, founded the Women’s Social and Political Union to step up the campaign for the right of women to have the vote in parliamentary elections.

What had been a sedate pressure group, willing to stay within the law to change the law, soon became militant. The women suffrage supporters (“suffragettes,” the Daily Mail called them, to mock them; it backfired) disrupted a Liberal Party rally in the Free Trade Hall in 1905 and two of their leaders – Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney – were jailed. Manchester had become Suffragette City, but it took a generation and many thousands of broken windows for women to secure the vote.

An excerpt from the walk
When Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney were arrested for disrupting the Liberal Party’s political rally at the Free Trade Hall in October 1905 they were taken first to a cell in Manchester Town Hall and then to Strangeways Prison.

Soon one of the leading Liberal politicians of the day turned up at the prison offering to pay the women’s fines so that they could be quickly released. The philanthropic politician was none other than Winston Churchill, MP for Oldham, who had recently crossed the floor from the Conservative benches. But was this really a welcome move or just a cynical one? Surely if the women agreed to his offer he could champion himself as being in control of them …

Fri 8 March 2019
Emmeline Pankhurst’s statue, 2.30pm.

Start: 08/03/2019 2:30 pm
End: 08/03/2019 4:10 pm
Venue: Emmeline Pankhurst Statue
Address:
Google Map
St Peter's Square, Manchester, United Kingdom, M2 5PD
Cost: About £10

08/03/2019

The Formidable Women of Manchester

International Women’s Day tour: Friday 8 March 2019
Meet: Midland Hotel, Peter Street, 5.30pm.
Booking: Please book here with eventbrite.

* Elizabeth Gaskell, who wrote Mary Barton, one of the classic “condition of England” novels in 1848.
* Hannah Mitchell, who challenged Churchill at St John’s School during the Suffragette era.
* Annie Horniman, who established Britain’s first repertory theatre company.
* Shelagh Delaney who pioneered modernist theatre with her groundbreaking A Taste of Honey.
* Ellen Wilkinson – “Red Ellen” who accompanied the Jarrow miners to London.
* Kathleen Ollerenshaw, who overcame deafness to become Lord Mayor, a leading educationalist, mathematician and advisor to Margaret Thatcher (now what sort of job is that for a Mancunian?!).
* Sylvia Pankhurst, Britain’s greatest political campaigner.

These are just some of the heroic Manchester women we will be celebrating.

A big demonstration in support of the International Labour Policy on Spain was held in Trafalgar Square. Ellen Wilkinson, Member of Parliament, addressing the huge meeting in Trafalgar Square in London, on July 11, 1937. (AP Photo)

Start: 08/03/2019 5:30 pm
End: 08/03/2019 7:10 pm
Venue: Midland Hotel steps
Address:
Google Map
Peter Street, Manchester, United Kingdom, M60 2DS
Cost: around £10

09/03/2019

In Search of the Peterloo Memorial

Please book here with eventbrite.

Image result for peterlooImage result for "henry hunt" memorial every street

Tour led by Ed Glinert, the only Manchester guide who has worked with both legendary campaigning journalist Paul Foot (author of Red Shelley) and Mike Leigh (director of the Peterloo film).

16 August 1819: troops charged 60,000 Mancunians at a rally called to lower the price of bread and demand the vote. More than a dozen people died and some 650 were injured. The event, the most violent episode in English political history, became known as the Peterloo Massacre.

A memorial to Henry Hunt, the main speaker at Peterloo, jailed for two years for his part in the demo, was erected in 1842 “to perpetuate the memory of Henry Hunt and those who fell in that action (Peterloo), and thus to show to future generations how the people of these times esteem sterling worth, and how they appreciate genuine patriotism.”

The authorities panicked again and clamped down on dissent. This time the reformers caved in and the inauguration was called off although thousands lined the streets to witness its arrival. In 1888 it was supposedly demolished, having crumbled to dust, the stone sold. Maybe it will magically re-appear in time for the imminent 200th anniversary. The following January C.P. Scott, editor of the Manchester Guardian, launched a scheme to erect a new monument to Hunt but insufficient funds were raised. 

This tour reflecting on the events of Peterloo, the build-up, the horrors of the day, the appalling aftermath, has been devised by Ed Glinert, political commentator with 35 years’ experience for various leading newspapers, magazines and publishers, who worked with Paul Foot on Private Eye. and as Foot once wrote, while the government was at war with France, which saw Wellington triumph over Napoleon’s forces at Waterloo in 1815, the British government was also waging war against its own people.

Ed Glinert, who has researched the story for decades, brings his unique touch to this chilling story.

Image result for peterloo 

Start: 09/03/2019 11:00 am
End: 09/03/2019 1:00 pm
Venue: Central Library
Address:
Google Map
St Peter's Square, Manchester, United Kingdom, M2 5PD
Cost: around £10

09/03/2019

The Women of Peterloo

Booking: Please book here with eventbrite.

In association with International Women’s Week, we recall the often-forgotten force behind the infamous Peterloo Massacre of 1819, in particular Mary Fildes, leader of the Manchester Female Reform Group who was singled out by the military for execution that fateful day.

Peterloo - Women

Start: 09/03/2019 2:30 pm
End: 09/03/2019 4:00 pm
Venue: Central Library
Address:
Google Map
St Peter's Square, Manchester, United Kingdom, M2 5PD
Cost: £10
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